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Posts tagged “indieweb”

  1. IndieWeb Link Sharing
    mxb.dev

    Max Böck:

    Posting a new short “note” on my site currently requires me to commit a new markdown file to the repository on Github. That’s doable (for a developer), but not really convenient, especially when you’re on the go and just want to share a quick link.

    It me.

    The new link sharing basically has three main parts:

    • a small Javascript bookmarklet to act as a “share button”
    • a form that collects and sends the shared link data, and
    • a serverless function to process it and create a new file.

    Gotta get on this train! I’m already working on it, though my solution will be based on the Micropub spec. But that live preview is sweet and now I want it too.

  2. Getting Started

    It’s 2019, and I have a blog now. This party is just getting started, right?

    I managed to cheat the system and avoid kicking things off with an empty slate; I began collecting links about a year ago, and my notes go even further back. Looking at the whole feed, it’s beginning to look like something.

    I expect to continue posting small updates frequently, but I want to turn that momentum into more substantial writing. That’s the exciting (and scary) part of this endeavor — the part I’ve always put off, with the lame excuse of not having some place on the web I could call my own.

    If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe. It took me over a year of overcomplicating it, but I now have a universe. Apple pie forthcoming.

  3. Signal v Noise exits Medium
    m.signalvnoise.com

    David Heinemeier Hansson:

    Traditional blogs might have swung out of favor, as we all discovered the benefits of social media and aggregating platforms, but we think they’re about to swing back in style, as we all discover the real costs and problems brought by such centralization.

    Dave Rupert comments:

    Blogging is back, baby! Awooo!

    I’m definitely feeling the momentum. I’ve been acutely aware of it as I’ve worked on getting this blog up and running over the past year, and it’s only getting stronger.

  4. Warp and Weft
    paulrobertlloyd.com

    Paul Robert Lloyd:

    Such notions of craftsmanship can soon lead us down a dangerous path, raising questions around elitism and discrimination. These are accusations you could level towards the IndieWeb. For all its promise of giving people the tools to regain ownership of their online identity and content, to do so fully and effectively requires a proficiency for coding and familiarity with an endless barrage of acronyms. Encouraging participants to selfdogfood only exacerbates the near-impenetrability and narrowness of this movement.

    Rob Weychert chimes in and gets a strong +1 from me:

    If even web people find it difficult, how can we ever manage to empower non-web people to produce web-like content?

  5. Taking Back The Web
    adactio.com

    Jeremy Keith at Webstock 2018:

    I also think we should remember the original motto of the World Wide Web, which was: let’s share what we know. And over the next few days, you’re going to hear a lot of amazing, inspiring ideas from amazing, inspiring people and I hope that you would be motivated to maybe share your thoughts. You could share what you know on Mark Zuckerberg’s website. You could share what you know on Ev Williams’s website. You could share what you know on Biz Stone and Jack Dorsey’s website. But I hope you’ll share what you know on your own website.