Links

Hand-picked links worth sharing.

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  1. Reducing motion with the picture element
    bradfrost.com

    Brad Frost:

    I was just talking with Dave about the accessibility of moving images on the web, and he said:

    hm… I wonder if you could use picture + prefers-reduced-motion?

    He then sends the following code:

    <picture>
      <source srcset="no-motion.jpg" media="(prefers-reduced-motion: reduce)"></source> 
      <img srcset="animated.gif alt="brick wall"/>
    </picture>
    

    Whoa! This is a revelation.

  2. He Crossed the Atlantic in a Barrel.
    nytimes.com

    Emily S. Rueb interviews Jean-Jacques Savin, a French adventurer who “spent 127 days alone in a large, barrel-shaped capsule made of plywood, at the mercy of the winds and currents.” It sounds like he had a lovely time:

    If it was nice, I swam, and dove underneath the barrel to catch a fish, sea bream, to supplement my meal.

    I made a breakfast in the morning, and a nice dinner in the evening. I had a lot of time to write my book. I played a lot of bluegrass on my mandolin.

  3. Let People Enjoy Things
    medium.com

    Esther Rosenfield:

    It’s no coincidence that you never see the comic posted in response to criticism of some understated indie drama or underground Bandcamp musician. You only ever see it used to defend the commercial output of mega-corporations; your Marvel, your Game of Thrones, your Ariana Grande, etc. It’s no surprise, either. A recent development in corporate art is the positioning of it as a cultural underdog, constantly under siege from Haters and Trolls. You see it most with the nerd properties mentioned above. They parry the childhood fear of being bullied for liking nerd stuff into the suggestion that those bullies are still out there, waiting to pounce, and they take the form of everyone who dares to not like the IP in question.

  4. Underlines Are Beautiful
    adrianroselli.com

    Adrian Roselli:

    Underlines, the standard, built-in signifier of hyperlinks, the core feature of the web, are beautiful.

    This is objectively true. They are aesthetically one of the most delightful visual design elements ever created.

    They represent the ideal of a democratized information system. They are a frail monument to the worldwide reach of ideas and discourse. They are proof of our ascension from trees and swamps, a testament to our species’ intelligence, and a witness to our inevitable downfall.

    ❤️

  5. Details / Summary Are Not [insert control here]
    adrianroselli.com

    Adrian Roselli:

    Once major browsers started supporting <details> & <summary> developers immediately started to play with them to see what sorts of patterns they could enhance or replace. This is a good thing. Experimentation pushes boundaries, improves understanding.

    However, we need to be careful of christening this new-to-us interaction as the solution to all our coding struggles.

  6. Into the Breach Design Postmortem
    youtube.com

    In this 2019 GDC session, Subset Games co-foudner Matthew Davis details the Into the Breach design process from early drafts to the final balancing decisions. Davis dives into years of cut content and iteration to show how Subset Games approached the difficult design challenges of making Into the Breach.

  7. Freedom
    inessential.com

    Brent Simmons:

    In a way, it feels like iOS devices are rented, not owned. This is not a criticism: I’m totally fine with that. It’s appropriate for something so very mass-market and so very much built for a networked world.

    But what about Macs?

    Macs carry the flame for the revolution. They’re the computers we own, right? They’re the astounding, powerful machines that we get to master.

    Except that lately, it feels more and more like we’re just renting Macs too, and they’re really Apple’s machines, not ours.

  8. How Recommendation Algorithms Run the World
    wired.com

    Zeynep Tufekci:

    Deep down, behind every “people like you” recommendation is a computational method for distilling stereotypes through data. Even when these methods work, they can help entrench the stereotypes they’re mobilizing. They might easily recommend books about coding to boys and books about fashion to girls, simply by tracking the next most likely click. Of course, that creates a feedback cycle: If you keep being shown coding books, you’re probably more likely to eventually check one out.

  9. Apple owes everyone an apology and it should start with me, specifically
    theoutline.com

    Casey Johnston’s butterfly keyboard saga continues:

    I dread the Overton window shift that Apple now appears to be attempting to push, which is that its customers and their crumbs and dust and bad habits are to blame, and should bend themselves around the “sensitive” keyboard, keep canned air (not supplied by Apple itself) on hand at all times, as if this is a problem we’ve always had, and not one Apple singlehandedly created with a nearsighted design.

    My 2014 MacBook Pro is still going strong, thankfully. (Knock on wood.)

  10. Advice to a Young Me
    craigmod.com

    Craig Mod:

    At 23 I was obsessed with minimizing recurring costs of living. They felt like poison to me.

    Obsessing over minimized cost of living has a light-touch hint of Thoreau to it: the calculating, the measuring, the valuing of time.

    “House: $28.12 ½; Farm one year: $14.72 ½ …” and on and on Thoreau wrote in Walden. “The cost of a thing is the amount of what I will call life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediate or in the long run.”

    Cal Newport’s Digital Minimalism devotes a chapter to Thoreau. My favorite quote though is from Frédéric Gros on Thoreau’s processes: “[Thoreau] says: keep calculating, keep weighing. What exactly do I gain or lose?”

  11. Why Vlambeer’s Co-Founder Thinks Mobile Games Market is Broken
    variety.com

    Brian Crecente talks to Rami Ismail about why traditional game development is broken on iOS:

    “I’m here to make video games,” he said. “I’m not here to fix somebody else’s problems. Our users? Absolutely. If they have a bug and it’s our fault, we’ll fix it. But having made a game in 2013 and then the platform going, ‘It’s broken now,’ That would be like if somebody went and updated like the internet and now all text is right to left. That’s how it feels to me. It’s like we made a game, so now we’re getting punished for it.”

    Apple has created a very inviting — but ultimately hostile — platform for games. There’s no malice there, they just don’t care about legacy software as much as they care about pushing things forward.

    Video games have historically been extremely well preserved, yet some older iOS games seem to be gone forever. This ephemerality is unprecedented; it’s not just bad for game developers, it really feels like a big part of gaming history is being erased.