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Posts tagged “design”, page 3

  1. The Little-Known Reason Pencils Are Yellow
    artsy.net

    Gabrielle Hick, for Artsy:

    “Competing pencil makers colored their pencils yellow and gave them Oriental names to suggest that the graphite they contained was equally good,” Petroski said.

    And it worked. An oft-repeated bit of pencil lore tells of an experiment conducted by Faber in the middle of the 20th century. The company distributed 1,000 pencils—half yellow, half green—to a test group. While both sets of pencils were identical apart from their color, the green pencils were returned en masse with complaints about their shoddy quality.

  2. Game Maker’s Toolkit: Making Games Better for Gamers with Colourblindness & Low Vision
    youtube.com

    Mark Brown’s “Designing for Disability” series seems to be very comprehensive and well researched. I’m moderately colorblind and feel very well represented by this video.

    It reminded me of the game I most wanted to love but just couldn’t play: Puzzle Bobble. If a level had both blue and purple bubbles, I was toast. Even though each bubble color had a different shape inside, the differentiation wasn’t enough for split second decisions.

  3. Games need to take a Minit and think about their huge worlds
    eurogamer.net

    Sam Greer, for Eurogamer:

    Some games are so big, and yet we engage with such a small percentage of their space in a meaningful way. When time isn’t an obstacle, why not have miles and miles of samey fields? “More is better” is such a common characteristic of big budget titles and the result is big spaces, filled with repetitive content and scarcely anything memorable. Our interactions with so many gaming worlds is passive. Even when they’re pretty enough to make us stop and snap a screenshot we’re still not learning them or unravelling them. They just want to get us to the next item on a checklist.

  4. Exclusive excerpt from upcoming book by ex-Apple engineer explores first iPhone software keyboard design process
    9to5mac.com

    Ken Kocienda recounts the process of designing the iPhone keyboard:

    I started to think about improvements, and to help me keep my keyboard goal literally in sight as I sat in my office, I measured and cut out a small piece of paper, about 2 inches wide by 1.3 inches tall, a little smaller than half the size of a credit card turned on end. I pinned up this little slip of paper on the bulletin board next to my desk. I looked at it often. This was all the screen real estate I had available for my keyboard.

  5. Brutalist Web Design
    brutalist-web.design

    David Bryant Copeland writes a manifesto:

    Brutalist Web Design is honest about what a website is and what it isn’t. A website is not a magazine, though it might have magazine-like articles. A website is not an application, although you might use it to purchase products or interact with other people. A website is not a database, although it might be driven by one.

    A website is about giving visitors content to enjoy and ways to interact with you.

  6. Frick Filler
    youtube.com

    Game designer Jan Willem Nijman:

    I gave a 4-minute talk at @AMazeFest about how making long games is unethical, watch it here

    I love this idea:

    We should all design our games like bus rides — they should have multiple stops along the way. If someone is happy with your game, they should be able to stop playing at that point. Give your game that ending after two hours. Give it that ending after ten hours for the people who want more of it and want to find all the secrets. Give it, like, the 100-hour ARG with speedrunning, trophy, whatever shit, but let people quit your game in a way that makes them happy.

  7. The Cult of the Complex
    alistapart.com

    Jeffrey Zeldman:

    Good communication strives for clarity. Design is its most brilliant when it appears most obvious—most simple. The question for web designers should never be how complex can we make it. But that’s what it has become. Just as, in pursuit of “delight,” we forget the true joy reliable, invisible interfaces can bring, so too, in chasing job security, do we pile on the platform requirements, forgetting that design is about solving business and customer problems … and that baseline skills never go out of fashion.