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Posts tagged “art”

  1. The Nerdwriter: The Real Fake Cameras of Toy Story 4
    youtube.com

    Toy Story 4 looks incredible, almost hyper-realistic. And it’s not a simple matter of technology getting better; there is artistic intent in the imperfections that give it that edge. Among other techniques, Pixar is simulating real-world camera lenses (along with their limitations). Evan Puschak explains:

    Animation has always drawn from the lessons of live action film, from the visual language of cinematic storytelling. Everyone who worked on Toy Story 4 understands that the imperfections — the way a lens distorts, or a camera operator shakes, or a light bounces — contain their own expressive potential. And when you combine these with the limitless world of animation, the results can be stunningly tactile.

    I hadn’t noticed that split diopter shot — it’s brilliant.

  2. Now You See It: The Art of Overanalyzing Movies
    youtube.com

    This is packed with great quotes from filmmakers that I hadn’t heard before.

    David Lynch:

    I never talk about themes. It’s a very big shame when something is finished and then people want you to translate it back into words. It never will work. It never will go back into words and be what the film is. It’s like describing a piece of music; you don’t hear the music, you just see the words. It’s better to let people conjure up their own ideas, having seen and experienced the film.

    Kubrick on explaining the ending of 2001:

    I tried to avoid doing this ever since the picture came out because when you just say the ideas they sound foolish, whereas if they’re dramatized one feels it.

  3. The Nerdwriter: AKIRA — How To Animate Light
    youtube.com

    Evan Puschak:

    Otomo has said that he wanted Tokyo itself to be a major character in Akira, and one of the ways he fleshes this out is with light. Particularly, neon.

    Neon has a special significance for both Tokyo and the cyberpunk genre. It is the bitter, but beautiful light that signifies both the colorful radiance and the gaudy consumerism of modernity.

    Man, this movie is just so cool. I rewatched it recently; it has lost none of its power to mesmerize me.

  4. Annihilation (2018)
    filmfreakcentral.net

    Walter Chaw feeds into my obsession with this weird, wonderful film:

    What’s impressive is Annihilation’s willingness and ability to evoke the soul-sickness that leads to great moments of art, great moments of self-destruction, and an equation of the two. Its heroes suffer from cinematic time: years can pass and outside the theatre it’s a mere two hours. They suffer, too, from this idea that you can enter into a space, experience something that is entirely alien, and then re-emerge struggling to articulate the crucible of your experience. How many versions of your old selves have you left behind in a museum, a theatre, a concert hall, a book? Is it a thousand? How many new versions have emerged into the uncanny bright of the day outside?